Rpp. GVI (Liaison for NFPA Committee on National Fuel Gas Code) R. J. Wright, Underwriters Labs of Canada

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1 Report of the Technical Committee on F s and V Heat Producing Appliances K. W. Howell, Chairman Underwriters Laboratories Inc. Systems for George H. Andrews, Dura-Vent Corporation Harold O. Beals, Forest Products Laboratory Robert J. Beiner, Int'l Masonry Institute Donald M. Bisset, Dept. of Public Safety, Augusta, ME Rep. FMANA Ralph Cunningham, Cerny & Ivey Engineers Inc. Thomas W. Dawson, Laconia, NH C. Royal Edwards, Royal Chimney Sweep Services Carl R. Flink, S. Maine Vocational Technical Inst. Charles H. Gibbons, Jr., Preway Inc. Howard A. Grisack, Warnock Hersey Alfred J. Hogan, Cypress Gardens, FL John P. Langmead, Gas Appliance Mfrs. Assn. Richard D, Peacock, U.S. Nat'l Bureau of Standards Gary T. Satterfield, Wood Heating Alliance Joseph F. Schulz, Van-Packer Products Co. Rep. ASHRAE Jay W. Shelton, Shelton Wood Energy Research Leo Stambaugh, Texas Utilities Electric Co. Richard L, Stone, Los Altos Hills, CA Rep. Selkirk Metalbestos Arthur J. Thompson, Southern California Gas Co. Rep. AGA J. Herbert Witte, Lincolnwood, IL Rpp. GVI (Liaison for NFPA Committee on National Fuel Gas Code) R. J. Wright, Underwriters Labs of Canada Alternates Paul J. Bourque, Huntsville, AL (Alternate to C. R. Edwards) Paul W. Droll, Selkirk Metalbestos (Alternate to R. L. Stone) Robert D. Lynch, Empire State Petroleum Assn. Inc. (Alternate to PMAA Rep.) Stanley J. Pople, Underwriters Labs of Canada (Alternate to R. J. Wright) Michael Sciacca, Wood Heating Alliance (Alternate to G. T. Satterfleld) Frank A Stanonik, Gas Appliance Manufacturers Assn. Inc. (Alternate to J. P. Langmead) Nonvoting Eleanor F. Perry, Consumer Product Safety Commission This list represents the membership at the time the Committee was balloted on the text of this edition. Since that time, changes in the membership may have occurred. The Report of the Committee on Chimneys, Fireplaces and Venting Systems for Hea~ Producing Appliances is presented for adoption in two parts. Part I of this Report, was prepared by the Technical Committee on Chimneys-~, Fireplaces and Venting Systems for Heat Producing/App~r'i-a~ces and proposes for adoption amendments to N~PA 97H-1~84, Standard Glossary of Terms Relating to Chimneys, V~/nts and Heat Producing Appliances. NFPA 97H-lg84.~pl~bllshed in Volume 8 of the 1986 National Fire Codes and in separate pamphlet form. Part I of this Report has been submitted to letter ballot of the Technical Committee on Chimneys, Fireplaces and Venting Systems for Heat Producing Appliances which consists of 23 voting members (including 1 voting alternate,--~r. Lynch); of whom 2~ voted.a~i-rmat~e]#.,_o._negat~.vel~,.none-abstai~ned~t~d 3 (b~llots were not returned (Messrs. Andrews, Flin-k-and J ~Shelton). ' Part II of this Report, was also prepared by the Technical Committee on Chimneys, Fireplaces and Venting Systems for Heat Prodoclng ~pglia-r~es~and proposes for adoption amendments to NFP~211"~-lg84.)Standard for Chimneys, Fireplaces, ' Ven s~and_soj-~(rrfuel ~ " "' Burn1 "n g Appliances. NFPA is published in Volume 5 of the 7986 National Fire Codes and in separate pamphlet form. Part II of this Report has been submitted to letter ballot of the Technical Committee on Chimneys, Fireplaces and Venting Systems for Heat Producing App]iances in three segments. Segment I consists of Proposal (2-1.2), Segment II" co~sists of Proposal (5-7.4), and Segment~[II-~co~sists of the balance of the proposals tc~pa-~t~.) The Technical Committee on Chimne~replaces and Venting Systems for Heat Producing Appliances consists of 23 voting members (including l'votlng alternate, Hr. Lynch). On Segment I, 1"7 voted affi~matlvely, 3 negatively (Messrs. Gibbons, Howell ~nd Satte.n~ _i.ejd). none abstained.ands3 6al~o~s were not returned (Messr Andrews, Flink and Shelton). Hr. Gibbons voted negatively on Segment I because he felt that the substantiation for the recommendation is based on the need for inspection of installation related item. Proper inspection of the installation must be made at the time of initial construction and installation of the chimney. Clearances, closeness to building insulation and proper connections all need to be inspected during initial installation before the chimney is enclosed, not after the fact through some type of access door or panel that may provide for limited inspection of.a small area on one side of the chimney. He states that there is n? evidence that' providing such an access is feasible or will result in an increased level of safety. Mr. Howell voted negatively because he feels that the reason given for the proposed change relates to improper installation procedures. Adding access, openings in fire resistive enclosures does not address the real issue of improper installation procedures which should be resolved during initial installation of the chimney. Hr. Satterfleld voted negatively on Segment I and said that an additional requirement for a means of inspecting the outer surfaces of a factory-built chimney is not needed. These chimneys now require inspection by a building inspector for proper installation before the chimney is enclosed. A provision for "a means...to examine the outer surfaces of the chimney" would imply different things to different people. For example, would looking down the opening between the chase and the chimney qualify? If so, no requirement is needed. Would this require inspection doors? If so, how many and where would they be located? A single fire rated door certainly would not be sufficient to inspect the entire chimney because the fire stop would limit the unobstructed view. How far can one see with a 2" clearance opening? No matter how many inspection doors were installed, it would be nearly impossible to get a 100% inspection. The only way to achieve this is inspection before enclosing. A mention of the corrosion of the outer chimney surfaces in Canada was cited at the September Committee meeting as a reason'for this inspection. This is not something that should be addressed in an installation standard such as NFPA 211. If corrosion is a problem, then it should be addressed in the appropriate product standards (UL 103, UL 127, ULC 610, etc). From Hr. Satterfield's discussions with industry, he feels that corrosion has not been noted to be a problem. He 16

2 votes negatively on Proposal because there is no evidence that this.requirement'could or would.'.,'" improve the safety of factory-built chimney. installati~ons. :.' ' On Segment II whic'h cons'i'st:~ ' of Proposal , 19 voted affirmative~l~y,--~_1 negatively (Mr. Witte} n6n~... a~s_tai.n.ed~and~3 ba.llots~were, nor. r.etu~r.nedd=~(messrs Mr. Witte.voted negatively because he feels that the proposed will permit a connector composed of stove p~pe sections hawng a wall thlckness of only 0.19 in (0.48 mm) to be routed :through a partition :into a space in the building other than the location of its origin. In such an installation some portion of the connector would be out of sight of the person attending the appliance or other occupant of the room. Any damage to the connector, such as the separation of joints or perforation by corrosion,-and consequent leakage of flue gases into the building would escape early detection. He feels that conflicts with NFPA 54 (ANSI Z223.1) and offers the following substitution; A single wall metal connector shall not pass ~hrough any partition (interior wall). A connector for residential.-type appliances (Table l-2(a), Column l} may pass through partitions (interior walls) constructed of combustible or noncombustible material if the entire connector system is listed for such service and is installed in accordance with the terms of its listing. Delete subparagraph (b) of A si'ngle wall metal connector for residential type.appliances may pass through an exterior wall constructed of combustible material if installed in accordance with Table n Segment III which consists of the balance of the proposals on NFPA 211, 20 voted affirmatively, 0 negatively, none-abstained and 3 bal~otrs-we~e~,,oot returned~m~ssrs Andrews, Flink and Shelton. I... 17

3 PART I (Log #I) 97M - I - (Chapter 1): Reject ~ : Royal Edwards, National Chimney Sweep Guild RECOMMENDATION: Revise definition of "Fireplace" as follows: Fireplace. A hearth, fire chamber', or similarly prepared place, smoke chamber, and a chimney. Revise "b." under definition of "Fireplace" as follows: b. Masonry Fireplace. A hearth and fire chamber of solid masonry units such as bricks, stones, listed masonry units, or reinforced concrete; and smoke chamber provided with a suitable chimney. SUBSTANTIATION: 'To address a part of a fireplace system that is the subject of several proposals to NFPA COMMITTEE ~OMMENT: A smoke chamber is not a defining element of a fireplace, i.e., all'flreplaces may not have a smoke chamber.. (Log #3) 97M (Chapter l): Accept ~ : Technical Committee on Chimneys, Fireplaces and Venting Systems for Heat Producing appliances RECOMMENDATION: In definition of "Fireplace Stove" change last part of definition to read as follows: "A freestanding, chlmney-connected, solid fuel burning appliance which is designed to be operated with the fire chamber either open or closed." SUBSTANTIATION: Make the definition of "Fireplace Stove" in 97M consistent with the definition in NFPA 211. (Log #2) 97M (Chapter l): Accept ~ : Royal Edwards, National Chimney Sweep Guild RECOMMENDATION: Add a new definition as follows: Smoke Chamber. In a fireplace system the transitional area from the damper opening to the beginning of the flue liner. ~VBSTANTIATION: To identify and define the subject of several proposals to M- 4 - (Chapter l): Reject ~_VBMITTER: a. Herbert Witte, Gas Vent Institute RECOMMENDATION: Revise to read:- Breeching. A conduit which connects a fuel burning appliance to a chimney or vent. (See also Chimney Connector, Vent Connector). SUBSTANTIATION: The proposed definition is not compatible with the definitions of "Chimney Connector", "Flue Gases" and "Vent Gases" in 97M and other NFPA Standards. Breechings may convey flue gases or vent gases. The definition recommended above is consistant ~ith other NFPA Standards. COMMITTEE COMMENT: This proposal and two other proposals that were held for further study in 1983, proposal 97M-4, 97M-5, and 97M-6 all relate to the definition of a breeching. The Committee's initial response was to accept 97M-4 in principle by combining some of the wording proposed in 97M-6. After much discussion it was concluded that all the proposals did not make a clear distinction between breeching and a connector and that the Committee needed to develop a more comprehensive definition of a breeching at some later date. As a result, the Committee rejected the proposals, but agreed that additional wording needed to be done at some later date to include a more comprehensive definition of what constitutes a breeching in contrast to a connector. 97M-.'5 - (Chapter l): Reject SUBMITTER:Gerald E. Lingenfelter,'American Insurance Association RECOMMENDATION: Revise accepted wording ~for Proposal 97M-8 (from Fall Meeting TCR , which proposed a new definition for Breeching) to read: Breeching. The conduit conveying flue gas from the appliance to' the chimney or vent."'' SUBSTANTIATION: We believe the Committe~ has unnecessarily restricted the definition to connectors to chimneys. "According to NFPA 54 "breeching" is defined by reference to "Vent Connector"', and "Vent Connector" is defined as "The pipe or duct.which connects a fuel-gas burning appliance to a vent or chimney." Also, Section 5-I of NFPA 21l states, "Connectors.shall be used to connect appliances to the vertical chimney or' vent... " COMMITTEE ACTION% Reject. COMMITTEE COMMENT: See Committee Comment" to 97M-4 97M- 6 - (Chapter I): Reject ~VBMITTER: Charles Page, Vermont Castings, Inc. RECOMMENDATION: Definition of Breeching should be the following: Breeching: The point of exit of flue gases into the conduit conveying Flue. gas from the appliance to the chimney. SUBSTANTIATION: Breeching is not commonly used to describe the chimney connector but rather the point of exit of the flue gases from the appliance. COMMITTEE COMMENT: See Committee Comment to 97M-4. This was a "hold for further study" item from the 1983 Fall Meeting TCD. 97M- 7 - (Chapter I): Reject SVBMITTER: Gerald E. Lingenfelter, American Insurance Association RECOMMENDATION: Accept Proposal 97M-3 as presented in the Technical Committee Report. (Reprinted from 1983 Fall Meeting TCR.) It is suggested that this definition be revised to read: Combustible Material. Material not complying with the definition of Noncombustible Material or Limlted-Combustible Material. It may include materials made of or surfaced with wood, compressed paper, plant fibers or materials that will ignite and burn or disintegrate under the influence of heat. These materials are considered as combustible even though fire-retardant treated or covered with plaster. SUBSTANTIATION: Presently NFPA 97M defines 3 types of materials: noncombustible, limited-combustible and combustible. However, the definition of "combustible material" is technically unsound. Confusion could result since at least some limited-combustible materials also meet the existing criteria of a combustible material; an example is gypsum wallboard. Further, as presently defined, "combustible material" may also include some noncombustible materials. Steel and aluminum will "ignite and burn" under certain conditions. But the definition of "combustible material" places no limitation on the conditions under which a material may ignite and burn to be considered "combustible". The most comprehensive way to define "combustible material" in NFPA 97M is to say that any material which is not "noncombustible" or "limlted-combustible" is "combustible". COMMITTEE COMMENT: This was a "hold for further study" item from the 1983 Fall Meeting TCD. It was the opinion of the Committee that adding the term "limited-combustible" to the definition of a combustible material would.only confuse the user and would not help to provide a better understanding of what constitutes a combustible material. It was concluded that the current NFPA 97M definition for combustible material as it relates to establishing appropriate clearances for chimneys, vents and heat producing appliances is adequate for the intended purpose. 18

4 PART II (Table 1-2(a)): Reject ~ : Trygve Husebye, Norwegian Wood Stoves NOTE: (This was a 1983 Fall Meeting TCD Comment with reference to Table 1-2(a) as published in the 1983 Fall Meeting TCR.) Headingi "Haximum Flue Gas Temperature ih Chimney, Column 3 showing 2000 F (I093 C). '' RECOMMENDATION: Replace the heading with the following: "Maximum flue gas temperature in the chimney to be 2100 F in three consecutive firing tests of 30 minutes each measured at the inlet to the chimney." SUBSTANTIATION: "2000 F maximum flue gas temperature in the chimney" is too low and va~gue unless the requirement spells out for how long the chimney should take this temperature and also where and.howthe temperature is measured. The 2lO0 F is more.in line with the recent UL Standards in Canada and in the United States, however, a few hundred degrees are easily.wiped out by changing the measuring points. COMMITTEE COMMENT: This proposal relates to the use of 2100 F tested factory-built chimneys with solid fuel burning appliances. This proposal was rejected on the basis that the Committee was submitting a proposed TIA which addressed the question relative to the type of chimneys suitable For use with certain type solid fuel burning appliances. (Log #lo) (Table l-2(b)): Accept in Princip!e ~_UBMITTER: Dave Fetters, Hart & Cooley RECOMMENDATION: Under Column I revise as follows: "At1 listed Category I gas appliances". Add new column between "Type BW"and "Type L" entitled: "Special Venting Systems, I. Listed Category II, III and IV gas appliances only." SUBSTANTIATION: The industry needs a new classifi'cation for venting systems for the equally new h'igh efficiency appliances. "Special Venting Systems" seemed appropriate since it would'include plastic and not be limited to "factory-built". The word "listed" was purposely left out because the~re is no standard to test to. (a) Under Column I revise as follows: "All listed gas appliances With draft hoods and~ther Category I gas appliances listed for use with Type B gas vents such as:" (b) Add a new column between Type BW and Type L as follows: Special Gas Vent Svstems Column III I. Listed Category If, III and IV gas appliances only (c) Renumber existing Columns III and IV. COMMITTEE COMMENT: To be consistent with definitions adopted in Proposal (I-3) (Log #5). (Log #5) (I-3): Accept in Principle SUBMITTER: Dave Fetters, Hart & Cooley RECOMMENDATION: Add new definition as follows: Appliance Categories. Appliances are classified for venting purposes into four categories as follows: (a) Category I. An appliance which operates with a nonpositive vent pressure and with a vent gas temperature at least 140 F above its dewpoint, measured as specified in the appropriate nationally recognized appliance standard. (b) Category II. which operates with a nonpositive vent pressure and with a vent gas temperature less than 140 F above its dewpoint,' ' measured at the entrance to the venting.system. (c) Category III. An appliance which operates with a positive vent pressure and with a vent gas temperature at least 140 F above its dewpoint, measured at the entrance to the venting system: (d) Category IV. An appliance which operates with a positive vent pressure and with a vent gas temperature less than 140 F above'its dewpoint, measured at the entrance to the venting system. SUBSTANTIATION: There needs to be a general agreement at the national level for standards and codes to address the types of appliances currently on the. market. Groups such as Underwriters Laboratories, the Central Furnace Standard Subcommittee (Z21) and the National Fuel Gas Code Committee (Z223) are reviewing similar'proposals. Revise definition to read as follows: Gas Appliance Categories. Vented gas appliances are classified for venting purposes into four categories as follows: (a) Category I. A gasappliance which operates with a nonpositive vent pressure and with a vent gas temperature at least 140 F above its dewpoint~ measured as specified in the appropriate nationally recognized appliance standard. (b) Category II. A gas appliance which operates with a nonpositive vent pressure and with a vent gas temperature less tha6 140 F above its dewpoint, measured at the entrance, to the venting system. (c) Category III. A ~as appliance which operates with a positive vent pressure and with a vent gas temperature at least 140 F above its dewpoint, measured at the enteance to the venting system. (d) Category IV. A gas appliance which operates With a positive vent pressure and with a vent gas temperature less than 140 F abo~e its dewpoin't, measured at the entrance to the "venting system. COMMITTEE COMMENT: To be consistent with NFPA 54, National Fuel Gas Cod~ (Log #6) (I-3): Accept in Principle ~ : Dave Fetters, Hart & Cooley RECOMMENDATION: Revise definition of "Ga~ Ve~t" as follows: Gas Vent. Delete words "vertical or nearly so". a. Type B Gas Vent. A gas vent for venting listed Category I gas appliances... b. Leave as is. Add a. newc. as follows: c. Special Venting Systems. Gas vent systems for venting listed Category II, 111, and IV gas appliances. SUBSTANTIATION: It is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to make an a'ssembly of parts above the damper area. In most instances, the flue tile is not centered'directly above the flue opening and some degree of offset is going to have to be made in the connector.' " Revise definition to delete "vertical or nearly so" and revise A,B, and C of proposal so that complete gas vent definition is as follows: :Gas~Vent. A.passageway composed of listed factory-built components assembled in accordance with the terms of listing for'conveying flue gases from gas appliances or their vent connectors to the.outside atmosphere.. (a) Type B Gas Vent. A gas vent, vertical or nearly so, for venting listed gas appliances with draft hoods and other Category'I gas appliances listed for use with Type B gas vents. (b) Type BW Gas Vent. A gas vent, vertical or nearly so, for venting listed gas-fired vented wall furnaces. (c) Special Gas Vents. Gas vents for=venting listed. Category II, III, and IV gas appliances. COMMITTEE COMMENT: Committee felt that "vertical or nearly so" i~ appropriate for Type B and BW gas vents. (Log #7)" 211-5"- (I-3): Accept in Part SVBMITTER: Dave Fetters, Hart & Cooley RECOMMENDATION: Delete note following "Vent Connector" entirely. SUBSTANTIATION: R~cent improvements in gas appliance technology allow for horizontal venting with single wall special venting systems. ig

5 COMMITTEE ACTION: Accept in Part. Delete note following definition, but add after "Type L Vent" the following: See also Chimney Connector. COMMITTEE COMMENT: Added for cross reference (I-3 and Chapter 3): Reject ~VBMITTER: Gerald E. Lingenfelter, American Insurance Assn. RECOMMENDATION: Do any of the following: I. Revise the definition of "Combustible Material" to read: "As used in this standard, a material which is either a 'combustible material' or a 'llmited-combustible material', as defined by NFPA 97M." Also, revise the definition of "noncombustible material" to be identical to the NFPA 97M definition~ 2. Hold this comment for future study. 3. Return the standard to Committee. SUBSTANTIATION: The definitions of "combustible material" and "noncombustible material" are not consistent with NFPA 97M and are technically unsound. As an example, consider aluminum. Aluminum will ignite and burn, and it is not specifically listed under the definition of "noncombustible material"; therefore, aluminum must be classed as "combustible" and proper clearances must be provided. Yet, vents may be constructed of aluminum! As another example, consider, fiberglass insulation. Is this material combustible or noncombustible? Since this product consists of fiberous glass, one might easily conclude that this product is noncombustible. But fiberglass insulation also contains combustible binders to hold the fibers in place. Since the definition of "noncombustible material" calls for such material to be "entirely of... glass", it must be considered combustible and clearances provided. The potential confusion and technical shortcomings of the existing definitions is apparent. This problem is not just a matter of adding certain materials to the lists in the definitions. The definition of "noncombustible material" is not further flawed. Although the definition indicates that materials "which will not ignite and burn" are intended, it then lists at least one material which will ignite and burn - steel. Of course steel burns only under certain conditions, but note that the definition does not restrict its statement regarding not igniting or burning to any set of conditions or even to "under the conditions anticipated". We are solely attempting to point out the technical shortcomings of the two definitions in NFPA 211 and urge the Committee to give this matter serious consideration. We recognize that at this time it may be unrealistic to" expect the Committee to go through the standard and insert the term "limited-combustible" in the text and a definition of "limited-combustible material". We therefore have proposed alternate courses of action. First, NFPA 211 could define "combustible material", for its purposes, as any material which is "combustible" or "limited-combustible" under the NFPA 97M definitions. This is probably not a very good solution since it may result in confusion, but could serve as a stop-gap measure. Holding this comment for future study would give the Committee time to go through the entire standard and make appropriate changes, but it also would permit the unsound definitions to continue at least until the next edition. If the standard were held up for a cycle, appropriate changes could be made and technically sound definitions would appear in the next published edition. Confusion would be minimized and the poor definitions would be eliminated. COMMITTEE COMMENT: This was a "hold for further study" item from the 1983 Fall Meeting TCD. The Committee reviewed the. proposal to revise the current definitions for combustible and noncombustible materials and concluded that the current definitions are adequate for the intended purpose of.the Standard for the same reasons stated in Segment I, 97M-7. (Log #30) (I-3.3): Accept SUBMITTER: Technical Committee on Chimneys, Fireplaces and Venting Systems for Heat Producing Appliances RECOMMENDATION: Add reference to end of "Vented Appliance" definition as follows: "See also Gas Appliance Categories." SUBSTANTIATION: To include reference to new definition proposed in (I-3) Log #5. (Log #29) (I-3.3 and 8-I): Accept ~ : Technical Committee on Chimneys, Fireplaces and. Venting Systems for Heat Producing Appliances RECOMMENDATION: Change definition of "Fireplace Stove" in both I-3.3 and 8-I as follows: Fireplace Stove. A freestanding, chimney-connected, solid fuel burning appliance which is designed to be operated with the fire chamnber either open or closed. SUBSTANTIATION: To make the definition in Chapters l and 8 consistent. COMMITTEE ACTION:' Accept. (Log #8) (l-5.1): Accept in Principle ~_VBMITTER: Dave Fetters, Hart & Cooley RECOMMENDATION: Revise as follows: I-5.1 A chimney or vent shall be designed and constructed so as to develop a positive flow adequate to remove flue or vent gases to the outside.atmosphere which satisfies the draft requirements of the equipment in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. SUBSTANTIATION: Updated to include performance associated with positive vent pressure appliances. Revise as follows: I-5.1 A chimney or vent shall be designed and constructed so as to develop a positive flow adequate to remove flue or vent gases to the outside atmosphere which satisfies the draft requirements of the appliance(s) to be connected thereto in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions or in accordance with the chapter on Chimney, Gas Vent, and Fireplace Systems, of the Equipment Volume of the ASHRAE Handbook. COMMITTEE COMMENT: This definition relates to more than gas appliances. (Log #9) I0 - (I-5.5 (New)): Accept SVBMITTER: Dave Fetters, Hart & Cooley RECOMMENDATION: Add a new I-5.5 as follows: I-5.5 Vent connectors serving equipment vented by natural draft shall not be connected into any portion of mechanical draft systems operating'under positive pressure. SUBSTANTIATION: Similar to paragraph 5-8.1, but since it involves draft, it should be located under I-5 while leaving alone. Accept with editorial change so that new I-5.5 reads. as follows: I-5.5 Vent connectors serving appliances vented by natural draft shall not be connected into any portion of.mechanical draft systems operating under positive pressure. (Log #31) II - (2-1.2 (New)): Accept SUBMITTER: Technical Committee on Chimneys, Fireplaces and Venting Systems for Heat Producing Appliances RECOMMENDATION: I. Add a new 2-I.2 to read as follows: 2-I.2 Factory-built chimneys for use with wood burning appliances shall comply with the Type HT Requirements of UL 103 or the requirements of ULC $629M for installations made after April I, Exception No. l:. Chimneys for factory-built fireplaces shall meet the requirements of UL

6 Exception No. 2: Open combustion chamber freestanding fireplace stoves li:sted only to UL 737 may use residential type and building heating appliance chimneys. Exception No. 3: Engineered appliance-venting systems that have been listed to operate without producing combustible deposits to the venting system shall be ins'tailed in accordance with the conditions of their listing and the maoufacturer's instructions. 2. Renumber existing 2-I.2 as Add a new Note 3 to Table ]-2(a) Chimney Selection Chart to read as follow,s: NOTE 3: Factory-built chimneys for use with all wood burning appliances=in Columns I and II shall meet the Type HT 6equirements of UL I03 or the requirements of ULC s62gm for' installations made after April 1; 1987~ " 4. Add to Item l of Columns I and II at end of parenthetical phrase as follows: "... and Note 3 below)". SUBSTANTIATION: The Committee-proposal is the result of a previous TIA (TIA No. 195 published in the August 1985'issue of Fire News) to add a new subsection 2-I.2. The public review and co~,ment period resulted in numerous comments and letters indicating that the TIA as proposed would create a number of difficult problems for the fireplace and chimney industries. The Committee felt that-the rationale to upgrade chimneys to a higher test standard was reasonable, but that a transition period was necessary before changing the flue gas temperature exposure from 1700 to the 2100 HT chimney. The Committee therefore submitted a Technical Committee proposed TIA that was issued by the Standards'Council on April 24, CQMMITTEE ACTION: Accept. Delete effective date requirement as the revised standard issuance will supersede that specified date. (Log #17) (2-I,.2): Accept ~ : Royal Edwards and Ashley Eldrige, National Chimney Sweep Guild R~qOMMENDATION: Add this to 2-I.2 as follows: "A means shall be provided to examine the outer surfaces'of the chimney with-in this enclosure." ~UBSTANTIATION: It is impossible to give an adequate safety examination of a factory built chimney without being able to see the outer surfaces of the chimney. For new as well as old installations it is imperative that this area be examined; Without visual confirmation the inspector, be it a building inspector, fire'inspectoror chimney sweep, (:an not determine the status of several safety factors. These factors include the c6rrect clearance to combustibles, the closeness of building insulation, as:well as the proper connection of one chimney section to another. It is the commonexperience of chimney sweeps throughout the country that seventy five percent of these systems examined for the first time have one or more of the above safety defects.? (Log #28) 21l (2-1.3 (New), 2-1.4):Reject "" ~_U~_MITTER: James F. Hoebel and Frank Brauer, United States Consumer Product Safety Commission RECOMMENDATION: Factory-built chimneys For u~e with factory-built fireplaces.should be tested to comply " with the requirements of UL 127,.with flue gas temperatures of at ]east I90O F in order to produce liner temperatures experienced during creosote chimney fires. This can be accomplished as follows: " Add a new to read as follows: Factory-built chimneys for use with factory-built fireplaces shall comply with the requirements of UL 127 with the following modifications to the UL 12T standard: Section I0.8 Temperature Test-17OO F Flue Gases. The test temperature designated-in this section title should be changed from 1700 F to 1900 F. Section I0.I0 The designated test temperature in this section should be changed from 1630 F (906 C) above room temperature to 1830 F (999 C) above room 'temperature. Table 10.I The Column I heat inputs should be changed to 184,200; 241,300; 305,200; 378,000; and 546,000 BTU per hour for the 7, 8, 9, 10 and 12 in. flue, diameters respectively. Revise existing to 2-I.4. ~UBSTANTIATION: Problem'- The 1700 F chimney test temperature requirements of the Ul 127 standard do not reflect the chimney liner temperatures experienced during a creosote chimney fire. Preliminary tests at CPSC indicate that raising the test control temperature of the UL 127 configuration to 1900 F would raise the liner temperature sufficiently to simulate a creosote fire. Justificatio n - A factory-built fireplace is an open combustion device. This Fact suggests that creosote formation in tbe ch!mney would be mlnimal. The risk of a serious chimney fire under these conditions wou!d therefore be small. However, CPSC estimates that up to half of the factory-built fireplaces may be modified in ways which make them function as closed combustion appliances. Up to 15 percent of the f~ctory-built fireplaces may have stove inserts installed in them; up to an additional 38 percent may be equipped with glass doors. Either of these modifications would be expected to lead to increased creosote production. According to the results of a CPSC epidemiological study, more than 8000 Fires in 1982 were estimated to involve metal chimneys connected to factory-built fireplaces. More than 2000 of these fires spread beyond the chimeny to nearby combustible materials, wh'ich'represents about-40 percent of all metal chimney fires that spread beyond the chimney. 'CPSC data indicate that the present UL OO F test develops a potential liner temperature of approximately 1450 F whereas creosote fire tests conducted at thenational Bureau of Standards averaged 1650 F. Raising the UL 127 test temperature to 1900 F would correct this deficiency. This proposal is independent of Tentative Interim Amendment I, does not modify that TIA, and is not intended to substitute for it.. COMMITTEE COMMENT: The proposal is to revise UL 127 over which the Committee on Chimneys, Fireplaces, and Venting Systems for Heat Producing Appliances has no jurisdiction. (Log #32) (3-2 and 7-3): Accept SUBMITTER: Technical Committee on Chimneys, Fireplaces and Venting Systems for Heat Producing Appliances RECOMMENDATION: Change reference from "ASTM C 64" to "ASTM C 27". Change reference from "ASTM C 64 Type G" to "ASTM C 27 fire clay brick". Change "fire brick" to "fire clay brick". Change "ASTM C 105" to "ASTM C 199". Change "fire clay mortar" to "refractory mortar". Change references in 3-2 and 7-3 and elsewhere in NFPA 211 where these references occur. SUBSTANTIATION: Regarding refractory mortar, the old ASTM C I05 has been withdrawn and has bee~ replaced with ASTM C 199. Other changes are also to update references and terminology ( ): Reject ~ : Dave Richison, August West Chimney Sweep RECOMMENDATION: If a masonry fireplace is to be used as a stove vent, (hearth unit or insert) then all units require a stainless steel sleeve be connected to the unit directly and proceed up through the damper area and continue throughout the venting system and terminating at the top of the chimney. The sleeve should be no thinner than.005 m and should be insulated to provide maximum heat transfer throughout the sleeve to increase stack temperature and thus reduce creosote formations. 21

7 SUBSTANTIATION: Fi reol ace Insert. A masonry fireplace was never designed as a stove vent, as a stove vent, a masonry fireplace has many times the air flow that a hearth unit or insert would require. This increase air flow reduces heat transfer and results in tremendous production of creosote. Field experience in sweeping as well as stove sales and educational information have resulted in forming my comment. I work with many insurance companies and fire departments and building code people and feel this problem is a result of improper use of masonry fireplace venting systems. Wood Stove Inserts. The insert market is one of the most dangerous solid fuel heating units produced. No one ever conceived that such a unit be placed inside the masonry fireplace. When a stove is inserted into a mas nry fireplace, the existing unit is far too large in relation to the 6 in. or 8 in. vent that would normally be required for the vent size of an insert. The thermal mass involved can not ever achiev e the proper temperature to eliminate creosote production (+192 ) because the insert is surging heat into the room and not into the chimney. It is time to standardize the venting systems on inserts so that a safer installation can be accomplished. I could write ten pages on the inserts alone, this would be a start at stopping the tremendous increases in fire deaths and property loss due to wood stove inserts as well as all solid fuel chimney connected heating units. / speaking engagements per year and am very concerned about the safety of my industry as well as the safety of the consumer. In my stove shop, as an example, I refuse to sell an insert without a direct connect safety system for the consumer as well as the protection of myself in relation to product liability. (See drawing - direct connect.) It is my professional opinion that direct connect policies, not positive connections should be made mandatory for the sake of the consumer or the insert be banned from the industry. CQ~MITTEE COMMENT:~ This was a "hold for further study" item from the 1983 Fall Meeting TCR. This proposal and others that were held for further study pertain to use of a continuous direct connect as a means of connecting a solid fuel burning appliance to the chimney of a masonry fireplace and limiting the cross-sectional area of the connector to no more than 1.25 times the area of the appliance flue collar. The NFPA 211 Standard was revised in 1984 to require that solid fuel burning appliances which use the chimney of a masonry fireplace be provided with a positive connector which extends from the appliance to the flue liner. In addition, the cross sectional area of the flue is limited to no more than three times the cross-sectional area of the flue collar of the appliance. The Committee established the requirements for a direct connect system as a result of input received from National Chimney Sweep Guild. It was indicated that a direct connect system which terminated at the masonry flue liner would help to reduce the amount of creosote formation in the smoke chamber of a masonry fireplace which, in turn, would reduce the fire severity of a creosote fire in the smoke chamber'area. After some discussion,, the Committee concluded that sufficient data had not been developed on the effectiveness of the 1984 direct connect requirement to justify changing the requirement at this point in time to require a continuous direct connect system. The current requirement does not prohibit using a continuous direct connect system which terminates at the top of the chimney. A Task Group was formed to further review this matter and review field reports pertaining to the effectiveness of the 1984 direct connect installation requirement. It was intended that the Task Group provide inrut to the Committee during the next review cycle for the NFPA 211 Standard. lj i I i ~01 ~ 6 c~-~n ~.q ~P,~-~F ~'~.~ ~.,J.Revised NFPA 211. The current proposed change woul d recommend the installation of a stainless system through the damper area into the smoke chamber and then stop at that point making this a safe installation. This approach is only a half hearted attempt to keep costs down on installation but does not address the safety issue on the insert market. (See drawing - positive connect.) Only the direct connect method of installing an insert properly addresses the safety issue on woodstove insert problems. The unit is sealed with airtight stainless pipe allowing the area around the pipe to be preheated by warm house air and the.005 thickness of the stainless allows quick heat transfer through the pipe allowing higher stack temperatures. Other insulating materials can be included to provide even better insulating qualities. BBckqround. I have been in the wood heating industry for 13 years; 7 years as a chimney sweep, 5 years in the masonry and stainless relining busi,ness and 2 years in the selling of wood stove units. I am also the Vice President of the Ohio Chimney Sweeps Guild, and am currently on the Board of Directors of the Wood Heating Alliance at executive level. I also perform (Log #3} (3-2.3): Accept in Principle ~LBMITTER: Robert A. Rucker, CMS Industries, Inc. RECOMMENDATION: The suggestion is to replace with: Fireclay flue liners should be installed ahead of the construction of the chimney as'it is carried up, carefully bedded one on the other in a medium duty, nonwater soluble refractory cement with close fitting joints left smooth on the inside. SUBSTANTIATION: In reference to on page , an option for refractory mortar refers to ASTM-CI05 medium duty. This, in fact, is not correct. ASTM-CI05 refers to fireclay. Fireclay is not a refractory cement as it has no binder. Therefore, if fireclay were to be mixed with water alone it would not ever set up or develop any strength. If fireclay were mixed with Portland,cement, it would not meet.minimum temperature requirements to qualify as a refractory cement. If the user is fortunate enough to know that fireclay should not be used as a refractory mortar, he must answer the following questions before he can assure himself of a quality installation... I. What kind of fireclay is best? 2. What should be added to it? 3. What proportions? 4. What kind of sand is best? 5. How much water should be added? 6. Will it shrink and crack? 7. Will it have good workability? 8. How much time before it sets up? 9. How long will.'it last? lo. Will the fireclay manufacturers guarantee the work? 22

8 We have seen instances where some or all of these questions have not been answered and as a result,. consumers have been left potentially hazardous installations. The following suggestion may go a long way to eliminate this confusion as there are products engineered and.manufactured complete specifically for this service, namely, nonwater soluble refractory cement complete with manufacturers instructions, etc. In existing 3-2.3, change "ASTM C. I05 i' to "ASTM. C 199". COMMITTEE COMMENT: ASTM C to5 has been withdrawn..the reference.change toc 199 meets the intent of the Submitter. (Log #18) (3-2.5): Accept in Principle SUBMITTER: Royal Edwards and James Brewer, National Chimney Sweep Guild RECOMMENDATION: Revise as follows: Flue lining for residential and low heat chimneys shall be separated from the chimney wall by a minimum of I/2 in. and a maximum of 8 in. of air space. The air space shall not be filled and only enough mortar shall be used to make a good joint and hold the liners in position. SUBSTANTIATION: At present there is no maximum limit, the air space can be as large as the mason wants it to be. Often it is 4 to 6 ft or more. Large air spaces between liner and chimney wall make weak and dangerous chimneys. If the liner sections do not hav e lateral support they can collapse very easily in the event of a chimney fire, lightning strike, or earth tremor. In the event of a chimney fire, if one of the lower flue liners crack or shift, all the liners above (with the possible exception of the top liner which may be held by the crown) can come tumbling down. Change "8 in." to "l in." so that revised subsection reads as follows: Flue lining for residenlial and low heat chimneys shall.be separated from.the. chimney wall by a -, minimum of I/2 in. (12.7 mm) and a maximum of l in. (25 mm) of air space. The air space shall not be filled and only enough mortar shall be used to make a good joint and hold the liners in position. Exception: When masonry chimneys are lined with a listed chimney.liner system, the system shall be installed in accordance with the listing. COMMITTEE COMMENT: The change from "8 in." to "l in." is to improve.construction so that there will be less likelihood of the lining shifting and less chance of liner movement or collapse. "'i (Log #33) ~ (4-I.I): Accept. SUBM'ITTER: Technical Committee onchimneys, Fireplaces and Venting Systems for Heat:Producing Appliances RECOMMENDATION:. Change subsection to read as follows: 4-I.1 Single-wall metal chimneys or unlisted metal chimneys shall not be used inside or outside of oneand two-family dwellings. SUBSTANTIATION: To clarify the intent of the Committee. ~O~MITTEE ACTION: Accept... (Log #19) ' ia i): Accept SUBMITTER: Royal Edwards and Dave Johnston National Chimney Sweep Guild RECOMMENDATION: Change,"6 in." to "18 in." I I... I SUBSTANTIATION: For fire safety a stove pipe requires a6 18 in., clearance to combustibles. This is a similar device in that it is a single wall metal device. We feel the required clearance should be 18 in. Is there proof that 6. in. is safe?.,.. ~OMMITTEE ACTION: Accept.. ":......,.~ '('" ~ og #34) ~'~" '=' (Figure 5-5): "Accept, '" ~ : Technical Committee' on Chimn'~ys, Fir'e~laces and Venting Systems for Heat Producing Appliances RECOMMENDATION: Remove spacer from behind the vent or connector in Figure 5-5. SUBSTANTIATION: Proposal is to correct Figure 5-5 as noted in Figures 8-7(a) and 8-7(d) "Do not use spacers directly behind appliance or connector.'.' qommittee ACTION: Accept.. - L ~ r. #25) (Table 5-5(b)): A-ccep~ "('Ldg.... SUBMITTER: Richard D. Peacock, Nati9na!' Bureau o'f.. Standards RECOMMENDATION: Revise Table 5-5(b) to'rea~ :as fol'lows (Table 5-5(b) shown on the following page):, ' SUBSTANTIATION: Table'8-7(b) was'revised'in ~:he l~st revision of NFPA 211 based "ijpbn the results' of're'search at the National Bureau of S'tanda'rds*. The "new Table 5-5(b) is s~mply the corollary to Table 8-7(b) for use with chimney connectors. The research showed that' the clearance reductions are equally applic'ablt~'to chlmney'~' connectors as they are to. appliance clearance reduction. The proposed table provides be ttei':.-. described and more flexible protection systems..bas'ed' upon solid research evidence of their suitabili'ty. Both changes make the clearance reduction systems consistent throughout.the st.~6dard. ~Loftus, 3.J., and Peacock," R.D., C'learances'and" " Methods of Protection for Wall and Ceiling Surfaces Exposed to Radiant Heating Appliances, Nat.. Bur.. Stand. (U.S.), NBSTN 1205 (December 1984).,.,.. "=" ' '' " (Lo'g #26)'r (5-5.5 and 5L5.6 INew) : Accepti=: "' ~UBMITTER: Richard D. Peacock National Bureau of "' Standards " : ' " " r, r RECOMMENDATION: Add new sections ahd to read as follows: For clearance reduction Systems using an air space between the combustible wall and ~t~e ~al'1' protector, adequate air ci.rculatiomshall be. pffovided by one of the following ~ethods. ":: " '. " ' Adequate air circulation may be. provided by leaving all edges of the wall protector open with at least.a l-in. (25.4-mm) air gap If the wall protector"is mounteb'oh a s'ingle flat wall away from corners, adequate air ci'/cul:ation ; may be provided by leaving only. the bottom and top edges or only the side and top~ edges.oren with at least' a.l-in. (25.4-mm) air gap Wall protectors that cover'two w~l~is" in a corner shall be oren at the bottom and top. edges with at least a l-ih. (25.4-mm) a.ir gap., ' All clearances shall'be measured from the outer surface of the combustible material to the nearest point on the surface o.f the cohnector, ~''~ ' disregarding any "intervening prote'ceion applied to the combustible material. SUBSTANTIATION: The.new sections 5=5.S~"a6d~5-5.6 'are adapted'from Chapt'er 8 to 'go along ~'i~h"the proposed new Table.5-5(b).,The sections, provide,guidance,for required air' reduction systems con's'iseent.t~tgughout the standard. -,..,... 23

9 Table 5-5(b) Reduction of Connector Clearance with Specified Forms of Protection 1"2"3"4.s'6"7"B Clearance reduction applied to and covering all combustible surfaces within the distance specified as required clearance with no protection (see section and Table 5-5(a). Maximum allowable reduction in clearance (percent) When the required clearance with no protection is 18 in., the clearances below are the minimum allowable clearance. For other required clearances, calculate minimum"allowable clearance from maximum allowable reductlon, s As Wall As Ceiling As Wall As Ceiling Protector Protector Protector Protector (a) 3 I/2 in. (90 mm) thick 33% masonry wall without ventilated air space. (b) I/2 in. (13 mm) thick 50% noncombustible insulation board over I in. (25 mm) glass fiber or mineral wool batts without ventilated air space. (c) in./o.61 mm (24 gage) 66% sheet metal over I in. (25 mm) glass fiber or mineral wood batts reinforced with wire, or equivalent, on rear face with ventilated air space. (d) 3 I/2 in. (90 mm) thick 66% masonry wall with ventilated air space. (e) in./o.61 mm (24 gage) 66% sheet metal with ventilated air space. (f) I/2 in. (13 mm) thick 66% noncombustible insulation board with ventilated air space. (g) in./o.6l mm (24 gage) 66% sheet metal with ventilated air space over in./o.61 mm (24 gage) sheet metal with ventilated air space. (h) I in. (25 mm) glass fiber 66% or mineral wood batts sandwiched between two sheets in./o.61 mm (24 gage) sheet metal with ventilated air space. 12/305 33% 9/229 12/305 50% 6/152 9/229 6/152 50% 6/152 9/229 50% 6/152 9/229 50% 6/152 9/229 50% 6/152 9/229 1 Spacers and ties shall be of noncombustible material. No spacers or ties shall be used directly behind appliance or connector. 2 With all clearance reduction systems using a ventilated air space, adequate air circulation shall be provided as described in There shall be at least a l in. (25 mm) between the clearance reduction system and combustible walls and ceilings for clearance reduction systems using a ventilated air space. 3 Mineral wood batts (blanket or board) shall have a minimum'density of 8 Ib per ft 3 (128.7 kg/m 3) and have a minimum melting point of 1500 F (816 C). 4 Insulation material used as part of clearance reduction system shall have a thermal conductivity of l.o (BTU-In.)/(Sq ft-hr- F) or less. Insulation board shall be formed of noncombustible material. s If a single wall connector passes through a masonry wall used as a wall shield, there shall be at least I/2 in. (13 mm) of open, ventilated air space between the connector and the masonry. 6 There shall be at least I in. (25 mm) between the connector and the protector. In no case shall the clearance between the appliance and the wall surface be reduced below that allowed in the Table. All clearance and thickness are minimum; larger clearances and thicknesses are acceptable. 8 To calculate the minimum allowable clearance, the following formula may be used: Cpr = Curt X (1 - R/IO0). Cpr is the minimum allowable clearance, Cun is the required clearance with no protection, and R is the maximum allowable reduction in clearance. 24

10 (Log #20) (5-7.1): Accept in Principle ~UBMITTER: Royal Edwards and Dave Johnston, National Chimney Sweep Guild RECOMMENDATION: Add a new to read as follows: I For residential type appliances the cross-sectional area of the flue, shall not be less than the cross-sectional area'of the appliance flue collar. The cross-sectional area of the flue shall not be more than three times the cross-sectional area of the appliance flue collar. "SUBSTANTIATION: This is a requirement with masonry fire place flues and should be extended to all residential appliances to avoid draft problems. Renumber as and add "solid fuel burning" following residential type so that new subsection reads as follows: For residential type solid fuel burning appliances the cross-sectional area of the flue shall not be less than the cross-sectional area of the appliance flue collar. The cross-sectional area of the flue shall not be more than three times the cross-sectional area of the appliance flue collar.. Renumber existing and COMMITTEE COMMENT: The Committee feels that the subsection is applicable to Chapter 8, Solid Fuel Burning Appliances. (Log #2) (5-7.4): Reject ~ : Henry B Swan, Vermont Mutual Insurance Co. RECOMMENDATION: Revise as follows: That an assembly consisting of noncombustible insulating materials, metal clad on the exterior connector a distance of 12 in. from point of entr~ be included as a recommended method of combustible wall penetration. Any unit must be tested in accordance with UL 103 standard for safety~"chimneys - factory built,including category, "chimney and vent connectors and accessories" - Guide DDey and be listed for 2100 Degree F - (HT). SUBSTANTIATION: Presently, there is only one recommended means of combustible wall penetration with, a chimney connector. The one means is by using, a section of prefabricated metal chimney in a horizontal "position. For the most part, this type of pipe is not UL listed above 1500 Degree F, great difficulty.arises in the installation, when installed horizontally, the interest of approval agencies is in doubt. COMMITTEE COMMENT: The intent of the Recommendation is covered by Proposal (Log #27). (Log~#35) (5-7.4): Accep ".. SUBMITTER: Technical Committee on Chimneys, Fireplaces and Venting Systems for Heat Producing Appliances RECOMMENDATION: Revise 5-?.4 to read as follows:, Connectors.for residential-type appliances (Table I-2(a), Column I) may pass through wal3s.or partitions constructed of combustible material if the connector is either listed for wall pass-through or is routed through a device listed for wall pass-~hrough and is installed in accordance with.the.conditions of the listing. SUBSTANTIATION: This revision to 5-?.4 processed as a Tentative Interim Amendment ( I) and was part of a revision including 5-7.4, and Table 5-7 (New). See Proposal Log #27) ~or action on and Table 5-7. Lmer 2" Clearance ~,,,~. Chimney Metal Base ~. Sleeve r ' ~ 2" Cleatance~, Thimble Metal Base 4 2" - Clearance Wall Studs 2' Oeo,~nce Model $B8 for 8" stovepipe Modet SB6 for S" $tovopipe 25

11 (Log #27) 2ll (5-7.5 and Table 5-7 (New)!: Accept in Principle ~ : Richard D. Peacock, National Bureau of Standards RECOMMENDATION: Revise as proposed in TIA #188 to read as follows: Connectors for residential-type appliances (Table l-2(a), Column I) with inside diameters less than or equal to 10 in. (254 mm) may pass through walls or partitions constructed of combustible material to a masonry chimney if the connector system selected or fabricated is installed in accordance with the conditions and clearances in Table 5-7. Revise first sentence for system B in Table 5-7 as proposed in TIA #188 to read as follows: ' B. Solid insulated listed factory-built chimney length of the same inside diameter as the chimney connector and having 1 in. (25 mm) or more of insulation with a minimum g in. (229 mm) air space between the outer wall of chimney section and combustibles. Revise first sentence for system C in Table 5-7 as proposed in TIA #188 to read as follows: C. Sheet steel chimney connector, minimum 24 gage (0.024 in./o.61 mm) in thickness, with a ventilated thimble, minimum 24 gage (0.024 in./0.61 mm) in thickness, having two l in. (25 mm) air channels, separated from combustibles by a minimum of 6 in. (152 mm) of glass fiber insulation. Add the following sentence to the end of the description for system C in Table 5-7 as proposed in TIA #188. "Any unexposed combustible material adjacent to a wall pass-through system.shall be covered with unpainted sheet steel, minimum 24 gage (O.024-in./O.61-mm) in thickness." Revise first sentence for system D in Table 5-7 as proposed in TIA #188 to read as follows: D. Solid insulated listed factory-built chimney length with an inside diameter 2 in. (51. mm) larger than the chimney connector and having I in. (25 mm) or more of insulation, serving as a pass-through for a single wall sheet steel chimney connector, minimum 24 gage (0.024 in./o.61 mm) in thickness, with a minimum 2 in. (51 rnm) air space between the outer wall of chimney section and combustibles. Revise last sentence for systems B, C, and D in Table 5-7 as proposed in TIA #188 to read as follows: "Supports shall be securely fastened to wall surfaces in all sides but shall be sized to fit and hold chimney section. Fasteners used to secure chimney sections shall not penetrate chimney section. SUBSTANTIATION: I. The original TIA proposed a limited number of wall pass through systems for only 6 in. inside diameter chimney connectors. Larger sizes, within reason, are common. The proposed changes make allowances for up to 10 in. diameter chimney connectors without changing other requirements of the provisions. Since the systems proposed in the TIA were tested to I100 to 1200 F, higher than the IO00 F operating temperature in NFPA 211, no added risk is introduced by the change. 2. The sentence added to the end of the description for system C rectifies an oversight in the original proposal. The research the TIA was based upon used a sheet steel covering on the wall studding adjacent to this wall pass-through system as it penetrated the wall. 3. The revised sentence at the end of the descriptions for systems B, C, and "D provides for the chimney sections to be secured with fasteners (such as wall bands supplied by the chimney manufacturer), but insures that nothing penetrates the chimney walls. Delete the second sentence that was proposed to be added to the description for System C in Table 5-7. Change last word of revised sentence for Systems B, C, and D to "flue liner". Revise Figure B for clarity; add new Note 5; and delete Note 4, adding last sentence to Revised and Table 5-7 will read as follows: Connectors for residential-type appliances (Table l-2(a), Column I) with inside di.ameters less than or equal to'10 in. (254 mm) may pass through walls or partitions constructed of combustible material to a masonry chimney if the connector system selected or fabricated is installed in accordance with the conditions and clearances in Table 5-7. Any unexposed metal that is used as part of a wall pass-through system and is exposed to flue gases shall be constructed of stainless steel or other equivalent material that will resist corrosion, softening, or cracking from fluegases at temperatures up to 1800 F (982 C). COMMITTEE COMMENT: Revisions made to clarify the intent of the Submitter and of the Committee. Table 5-7 Chimney Connector Systems and Clearances from Rom Wall Combustibles for Residential Heating Appliances System Clearance in mm..... j,, II MI,~, c m y ~.-~'~, w~v~v c ~ w A. Minimum 3.5 in. (90-mm) thick brick masonry wall framed into combustible wall with a minimum of 12 in. (305'mm) brick separation from clay liner' to combustibles. Fire clay liner (ASTM C315 or equivalent), minimum 5/8-in (16-mm) wall thickness, shall run from outer surface of brick wall to, but not beyond, the inner surface of chimney flue liner and shall be firmly cemented in place. 12/305 26

12 Table 5-7 con't System Clearance in. mm,-,. B~ Solild insulated listed 9/229 factory-built chimney length of the same inside diameter as the chimney connector and ',having I in. (25 mm)'or more." of insulation with a minimum "9 in. (229 mm) ai6 space between the outer wall of chimney section and combustibles. Supports shall be securely fastened to wall surfaces on all,. sides and shall be sized to fit and hold chimney section. ' Fasteners used to sec, ure chimney ' " sections shall not penetrate chimney ~' flue liner. ' C. Sheet steel chimney connector, 6/152 - minimum 24 gage (0,024 in "/0.6] mm) in thickness, with a ' Ventilated teimble, minimum ~24 gage (0 024 in./o.61 mm) in / ~thickness, havin'g two l in. (25 mm) air channels, separated,, t -'from combustibles by a minimu~ of 6 in. (152 mm) of'glass fiber ~' r ',~=' r '" '" ' insulation. " J~:~r~1, - ~. Opening shall be cov'ere'd and "thimble - l :J I m (=s ~ ~c~..,,...~. minimum 24 gage (0.024 in /0.61 mm) in thickness. ', " Supports sh'all be securely fastened ~,~.--. ~2..~.. to wall surfaces on all sides and.... c,s,..~ shall be sized "to fit'and hold c~,,.:,~ ~ ~a~,..~u,.., : chimney section Fasteners used ".~."~',~,' ' " " " ' ": " -'.to secure chimney secti'ons shall t, -~ -' ~,' not penetrate chimney flue liner -. '" " D. Solid insu lated listed 2/51 ' """ factory-built chimney length "' "'' " " " ~ ' with an inside diameter 2 in. " ". " ~ ~: (51 mm) larger than the'chimney. " connector and having I in. (25 mm) " "" : ' ;',-:-~ &r more ~f insulation, serving'as ' : , a. pass-through' for a single wall ~ ~ i, sheet steel chimney connector, " ] ~ ~'in the thickness wi'th;a minimum " ' "2 In (51 mm) alr space between the I" ~ '..:~c...,,...,..'~ Outer wall of chimney section and " " ~ _ ~. N,,, ~ " '"..combustibles. "',.. ' ~I~'%Z_RI"4~.... ~ " Minimum length of chimney section b~...~'." " " ' 'shall be 12 in..(305"mm). Chimney ~.."~,. " section concentri'~ with and spaced.~.,,,, l in. (25 mm) away from"connectqr by means of sheet steel support plates on both ends of chimney section " " Opening. shall be covered'and, " ~"..-chimney section supported On both ": " ".,~ides with sheet steel suppgrts,"' "~ '., minimum 24; gage '(0 024 in.'/o 6l mm)' ' '" in thickness. " '.. "Supports 'shal'l be securely fastened to wall surfaces on all sides and ' "shall be sized to fit'and hold chimney section Fasteners used... ' "' "... to secure c~imney sec.tions shall "~ not penetrate chimney flue liner,',j i,, Addit'ional "RequiPements:,..,,., c I. Insulation material used as'part'of a wall pas.s-through system shall be of noncombustible, material and shall have a thermal conductivity of l.o BTU-in./ft2. F (4 88 kg.cal/hr-m2-' C) or,less;~ 2. All clearances and thicknesses are:minimums; ~arger'clearances and thicknes'ses are acceptable. " " ;' "" 3. Any material used to close up an'openisg fo'r the connector shall be:of ' noncombustible material '' 4. A connector to a masonry chimney shall extend in one piece'throu.gh'the wall pass-through system and the chimney wall to the inner face of the flud liner, but not beyond.., 27

13 (Log #11) (6-1.1): Accept in Principle ~ : Dave Fetters, Hart & Cooley RECOMMENDATION: Revise as follows: Type B gas vents shall be used to vent only listed Category I gas appliances... SUBSTANTIATION: This change is required for consistency. Change 6-I.I to read as follows: Type B gas vents shall be used to vent only listed gas appliances with draft hoods and other Category I gas appliances listed for use with Type B gas vents. Type B gas vents shall not be used for venting: (a) Vented wall furnaces listed for use with Type BW gas vents only. (b) Incinerators. (C) Appliances which may be converted readily to the use of solid or liquid fuels. (d) Combination gas-oil burning appliances. (e) Appliances listed for use with chimneys only. COMMITTEE COMMENT: To be consistent with other similar changes. (Log #12) (6-I.I Exception (f) (New)): Accept in Part ~ : Dave Fetters, Hart & Cooley RECOMMENDATION: Add new (f) to 6-I.I Exception as follows: (f) Listed Category II, III and IV gas appliances unless specifically listed for such and stated in the manufacturer's instructions. SUBSTANTIATION: This proposal would prevent use of Type B gas vent where leakage of condensate and/or flue gases is likely to occur. COMMITTEE ACTION: Accept in Part. Delete Exception, but continue list with new (f) as follows: (f) Listed Category II, III, and IV gas appliances. COMMITTEE COMMENT: Type B vents are not suitable for CategorY II, III, and IV gas appliances. (Log #13) (6-I.3): Accept in Principle ~ : Dave Fetters, Hart & Cooley RECOMMENDATION: Revise 6-I.3 to read: 6-I.3 Listed Category II, III, and IV gas appliances shall be considered properly vented by special venting systems when installed in accordance with the terms of the appliance listing, the appliance and vent manufacturers' instructions and 6-3 and 6-5. SUBSTANTIATION: Provision must be made in the absence of a vent performance national standard for the use of a "special venting system" that, at this writing, is not a listed system. Also, it is very important to make the distinction between the above "special venting system" which could include, but not be limited to, a factory-built coated single wall pipe system, and paragraph 6-1.4, single wall metal pipe. Revise new paragraph 6-I.3 as follows: Special gas vents for listed Category If, III, and IV gas appliances shall be installed in accordance with the appliance and vent manufacturers' instructions. Retain and renumber existing and renumber COMMITTEE COMMENT: Requirements in 6-3 and 6-5 are not applicable to special vents. (Log #14) (6-I.4): Accept in Principle SUBMITTER: Dave Fetters, Hart & Cooley RECOMMENDATION: Revise 6-I.4 as follows: Single-wall metal pipe, other than a factory-built special venting system used tovent Category II, III and IV gas appliances, shall conform to the following requirements. SUBSTANTIATION: This proposal is an attempt to distinguish between locally supplied single wall pipe and a factory-built system which, after the development of a nationally recognized performance standard, would be listed but currently is not. It is at least a developed product acceptable to the marketplace as a viable means to vent high efficiency appliances. All references to a "listed" product must be withheld pending the development of a suitable standard. Requirement of a listed product at this time would also rule out the use of plastic pipe as a venting material. Revise to read as follows: 6-I.4 Single-wall metal pipe other than special gas vents used to vent Caterogy II, III, and IV gas appliances shall conform to the following requirements. ~OMMITTEE ~OMMENT:. To be consistent with,changes in other similar proposals. Log #15) (6-2 and Exception (New) : Accept in Principle ~MITTER: Dave Fetters, Hart & Cooley RECOMMENDATION: Revise 6-2 as follows: 6-2 Location. Outside vents for appliances used in cold climates shall be insulated. Exception: Type B gas vent unless experience indicates otherwise. SUBSTANTIATION: Ithas been our experience that building inspectors do not make the distinction between Type B gas vent which is insulated and other types of venting materials which may not be insulated. Revise 6-2 to read as follows with no Exception: 6-2 Location. Single-wall outside vents for appliances used in cold climates shall be insulated. COMMITTEE COMMENT: Revised to clarify that section applies to single-wall vents. (Log.#16) (6-6):" Accept in Principle ~ : Dave Fetters, Hart & Cooley RECOMMENDATION: After 6-6'.I.2 but before 6-6.2, add a new paragraph to read as follows: "Equipment with integral vents. Gas utilization equipment incorporating integral venting means shall be properly vented when installed in accordance with its listing, the manufacturer's instructions and 6-3 and 6-5." SUBSTANTIATION: A logical extension of the standard for this type of appliance. Add a new subsection to read as follows: Equipment with Integral Vents. Gas utilization appliances incorporating integral venting means shall be considered properly vented when installed in accordance with the terms of their listing.,committee COMMENT: To be consistent with NFPA 54, National Fuel Gas Code (Log #21) 2ll (7-I): Reject SUBMITTER: Royal Edwards, National Chimney Sweep Guild RECOMMENDATION: Revise definition of "Fireplace" and "Masonry Fireplace" to read as follows: Fireplace. A hearth, fire chamber, or similarly prepared place, smoke chamber and a chimney. Masonry Fireplace. A hearth; fire chamber of solid masonry units such as bricks, stones, listed masonry units, or reinforced concrete; and a smoke chamber provided with a suitable chimney. SUBSTANTIATION: The smoke chamber is part of most fireplaces but its construction has not been addressed in past NFPA 21l documents. With other proposals submitted, we would like to have it included in the next NFPA 211 edition. COMMITTEE COMMENT: A smoke chamber is not a defining element of a fireplace, i.e., all fireplaces may not have a smoke chamber. 28

14 -" " (Log #22) (7-2): Reject SUBMITTER: Royal Edwards and Pete Luter, National Chimney Sweep Guild RECOMMENDATION: Add to paragraph as follows: "Means shall be provided to examine the outer surfaces of the" sides and rear of the factory-b'uilt fireplace." SUBSTANTIATION: A growing problem that is being found around the countryis the rusting and deterioration of the outer wall of these units. A visual inspection capability will enable these problems to be detected before they cause house fires. COMMITTEE COMMENT: 'No data was presented to show a problem exists, and if a corrosion problem does exist, the Committee felt that this is a situation that should be addressed by the manufacturers. (Log #23) (7-2): Accept in Principle ~ : Royal Edwards and Drew Forester, National Chimney Sweep Guild RECOMMENDATION: Add to end of existing paragraph: "For cleaning purposes, means shall be provided for access to the venting area above and immediately behind any movable damper valve plate." SUBSTANTIATION: It isimpossibleto properly clean the smoke chamber area of many of these units." There is no way to remove combustible material that collects on or falls into this region." Add a new subsection, 7-3.4, to read as follows: Accessability. For cleaning purposes, means shall be provided for access to the venting area above and immediately behind any movable damper'valve plate in masonry fireplaces and steel fireplace units. COMMITTEE COMMENT: The Committee felt that the requirement was more appropriate as a separate subsection under Chapter 7. (Log #24) ( (New) and ): Accept in Principle ~ : Royal Edwards, National Chimney Sweep Guild RECOMMENDATION: Add new paragraph to and renumber existing paragraph to Smoke chamber walls where no lining is provided shall be not less than 8 in. thick. With a suitable liner the smoke chamber wall thickness shall be not less than 4 in. The smoke chamber height shall not be greater than the inside width of the fireplace room opening. The smoke chamber depth shall not be greater than the depth of the fireplace fire chamber. The inner surfaces of the smoke chamber shall be smooth and not inclined more than 45 from vertical. SUBSTANTIATION: Smoke chambers are a major problem for two main reasons. I. Many structural fires originate in the area directly outside the smoke chamber walls. 2. Many functional and operational problems are caused by poorly designed'smoke chambers. ~OMMITTEE ACTION: Accept in Principle. Add a new paragraph and renumber existing Raragraph to Where a lining of low--duty fire clay brick (ASTM C 27-84) or the equivalent, at least 2 in. (51 mm) thick laid in refractory mortar (ASTM C , medium duty), or the equivalent, or other approved lining is provided, the total thickness of the smoke chamber'walls including the lining, shall be not less than 6 in. (152 mm). When unlined the smoke chamber wall thickness shall be not less than 8 in. The smoke chamber height shall not be greater than the inside width of the fireplace room opening. The smoke chamber depth shall not be greater than the depth of the "fireplace ~ire chamber. The inner surfaces of the smoke chamber shall be smooth and not inclined more than 45 from vertical. COMMITTEE COMMENT: To better express the Committee's intent to provide an adequate smoke chamber lining and to increase the minimum liner thickness (Chapter 8): Reject ~ : Gerald E. Lingenfelter American Insurance Assn. RECOMMENDATION: Reference to Proposal from the 1983 Fall.Meeting TCR that recommended: "It is suggested that Chapter 8, "Solid Fuel Burning Appliances" be removed from NFPA 211 and be incorporated into its own standard, Standard for the Installation of Solid Fuel Bvrnino Eouioment." Accept Proposal in its entirety and revise the'title, scope and purpose of NFPA 211 to delete "references to solid fuel burning appliances. SUBSTANTIATION: Although this proposal was accepted in principal, we understand that the Standards Council officially cleared the way for the proposed action. Our comment issubmitted to assist'in the swift completion of this matter. COMMITTEE COMMENT: 'This was a "hold for "further study" item from the 1983 Fall Meeting TCD and pertains to a proposal to put solid fuel appliance requirements in a separate document. The Committee studied thi's proposal and concluded that the provisions for solid fuel burning appliances should remain in thenfpa 211 document. It was concluded that there was an important interactive relationshi P between a solid Fuel appliance and its chimney and that it would be in the best interest of the user to keep the requirements for solid fuel appliances and chimneys in one document (8-5.4): Reject SUBMITTER: G. Drew Forrester, Olde Towne Chimney Sweep RECOMMENDATION: None. SUBSTANTIATION: ""Airtight" burning appliances especially (solid fuel) vented into a fireplace should be.direct connected to the top of the chimney and not to ~ust the beginning of the flue, except where the flue is no larger in area than percent larger than the.opening (flue size)'of the burning appliance. Too large of a flue reduces combustion efficiency, increases smoke residence time and thus Towers flue gas temperature. I have witnessed often third degree creosote built up in oversized flues of fireplaces where "airtight" solid fuel burning appliances were installed into without direct'connection to the top of the flue. COMMITTEE COMMENT: This was a "hold for further study" item from the 1983 Fall Meeting TCR. See comment to proposal (8-5.4): Reject ~ : Jeff Gitlin, Jeff Gitlin Chimney Sweeps. RECOMMENDATIOn: Revise'Section 8:5.4 to read:, "Another solid fuel-burning appliance shall not use a masonry fireplace flue. Exception: A solld'fuel burning appliance such as a stove or insert may use a masonry fireplace flue if the following two conditions'are met: (I) There is a connector which extends from the appliance to the termination of the masonry chimney.; (2) The cross-sectional area of the flue is no more than 2 times the cross-sectional area of the Flue collar of the appliance." SUBSTANTIATION: Through my seven years of'experience of working with these systems, I have found that a connection at the bottom of the flue is effective in passing the gases through the smoke chamber, but this is a very difficult and costly procedure For installation, inspection, and dismantling for maintenance. This requires a connection where it is generally physically impossible to approach!without tearing out a large area of wall and chimney. 'To" connect to this point'is not reasonable, when with relatively little additional expense, the connector can be taken through the flue and to termination. Thi's also deals with the inherent problems of venting these appliances into oversized flues, which results in poor draft, excessive creosote condensation, glazing, and off-set or cracked tile liners. ~OMMITTEE ACTION: Reject. COMMITTEE COMMENT: This was a "hold for further study" item from the Ig83 Fall Meeting'TCR. See comment to proposal, J 29